Rohini Pande

Delhi's air pollution: What China got right and where we fall behind

Delhi's air pollution: What China got right and where we fall behind

November 21, 2016

Delhi’s smog may have made national headlines in early November 2016–when air-quality levels exceeded by 40 times safe limits set by the World Health Organization (WHO)–and subsequently receded from public attention. But as IndiaSpend was interviewing Pallavi Aiyer, author of ‘Choked’, a new book that investigates Delhi and India’s air-pollution crisis, the air was unhealthy or worse in the majority of 17 cities where our sensors are installed.

‘95% Of China’s Power Plants Have Pollution Filters, In India, 10% Do’

‘95% Of China’s Power Plants Have Pollution Filters, In India, 10% Do’

November 21, 2016

Aiyer, a journalist who’s lived and reported from some of the most polluted cities in the world, including Beijing and Jakarta, argues that many countries have been in India’s situation, and India would do well to learn from their experiences.
Data analysis by Eric Dodge & Rohini Pande at the Evidence for Policy Design (EPoD) at Harvard Kennedy School. 

Your inflexible friend

Your inflexible friend

October 8, 2016

An experiment in Kolkata by two American researchers, Erica Field and Rohini Pande, found that offering borrowers a grace period of just two months at the beginning of a microloan doubled the rate at which new businesses were created. Borrowers were able to take bigger risks, which brought bigger rewards on average. After three years business profits were 41% higher and household incomes were up by 19.5%. If microlending could routinely deliver results like that, it would still be the height of fashion.

Making Microfinance More Effective

Making Microfinance More Effective

October 5, 2016

Traditional microcredit hasn’t lived up to expectations, but we are learning how to improve it. The Grameen model of microfinance gained a great deal of attention in the international development field after early data showed that it was associated with high repayment and low default. This model makes small loans, usually to women, without requiring collateral.

Hillary Wouldn’t Be the First Female American President

Hillary Wouldn’t Be the First Female American President

August 1, 2016

By Robin Wright - The New Yorker

“More than half of the countries in the world have implemented some type of political quota,” Rohini Pande and Deanna Ford, of Harvard’s Kennedy School, write. “They have led to a dramatic increase in female leaders across the globe.”

April wasn't January

April wasn't January

May 13, 2016

By Anant Sudarshan, Santosh Harish, Michael Greenstone, and Rohini Pande - The Indian Express

Neither pollution nor congestion significantly decreased as they did during the January experiment. An enduring solution lies in scaling up the smaller, successful programmes.

How To Get India’s Women Working? First, Let Them Out Of The House

How To Get India’s Women Working? First, Let Them Out Of The House

April 9, 2016

By Rohini Pande, Jennifer Johnson, and Eric Dodge - IndiaSpend

India boasts superior rates of women serving in political office compared to other emerging economies: the nation just swore in its 16th female Chief Minister, Mehbooba Mufti. Yet it lags well behind its competitors in its rate of women’s labour force participation. There is surprisingly little data to answer why. But one reason stands out: women can’t get to work.

Asking the right question to get the right policy

Asking the right question to get the right policy

April 4, 2016

By Eric Dodge, Charity Troyer Moore, and Rohini Pande - Ideas for India

There is consensus in the development community on the importance of bridging the gap between researchers and practitioners; however, misaligned incentives underlie this gap. In this article, Pande, Moore and Dodge of Harvard Kennedy School, explain how bringing policymakers together with researchers to work more iteratively ensured that data from MGNREGA - the world’s largest public works programme - became accessible and relevant to those who use it.

Five Key Lessons About Women And Work In India

Five Key Lessons About Women And Work In India

March 8, 2016

By Rohini Pande, Charity Troyer Moore, and Jennifer Johnson - IndiaSpend

In the South Asian context, on International Women’s Day, our analysis of the state of women and work in India does not offer clear explanation. Countries often experience a dip in women’s labour-force participation as incomes rises and women drop out of low-paying menial work, usually in agriculture. But typically as the economy develops further and education levels rise, more and more women enter the labour force.