David Yanagizawa-Drott

Less work and more pray...

Less work and more pray...

July 2, 2016

The Economist

But Messrs Campante and Yanagizawa-Drott found that the most important reason for lower growth was that Muslims choose to work fewer hours. They are seemingly no less productive in years when fasts are longer. Surveys indicate that during those years they value work less and religion and leisure more. “You could say it is a healthy shift in attitudes,” says Mr Yanagizawa-Drott.

Measuring the power of protests, propaganda, and religion

Measuring the power of protests, propaganda, and religion

October 28, 2015

By Matt Cadwallader - HKS PolicyCast for the Boston Globe

This week on the Harvard Kennedy School PolicyCast, Yanagizawa-Drott explains how he and his colleagues formulated each inquiry in order to find answers to more fundamental questions: Do protests influence elections? Can hate speech lead directly to more violence? Do religious activities increase happiness?

Dodgy fertiliser is keeping Uganda hungry

Dodgy fertiliser is keeping Uganda hungry

August 5, 2015

By Francisco Toro - The Guardian

For agricultural development practitioners, it’s one of the great unanswered questions: why has farm productivity in Africa lagged so far behind the rest of the developing world? A new study [by David Yanagizawa-Drott and others] suggests part of the reason is that the planting materials available to African farmers are just terrible.

Counting Ramadan: The Economics of Religion

Counting Ramadan: The Economics of Religion

July 14, 2015

By Jitendra Prakash - Foreign Affairs

To understand how Ramadan affects the economy, Public Policy Professors Filipe Campante and David Yanagizawa-Drott at the Harvard Kennedy School examined over six decades of data.

In their paper, Campante and Yanagizawa-Drott establish that Ramadan has a negative economic impact. To determine cause and effect, rather than mere correlation, they exploit a unique variation in how Ramadan is practiced worldwide

Propaganda and conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan genocide

Propaganda and conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan genocide

December 3, 2014

HKS Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy

A 2014 paper [by David Yanagizawa-Drott] published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, “Propaganda and Conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan Genocide,” looks at the impact of Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM), a key media outlet for the Hutu-led government, on violence and killings of the Tutsi minority.

As Millions Of People Fast For Ramadan, Does The Economy Suffer?

As Millions Of People Fast For Ramadan, Does The Economy Suffer?

July 24, 2014

By Shankar Vedantam - NPR

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And we are approaching the end of Ramadan, the holy month where Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. The fact that hundreds of millions of people around the world go without food all day has drawn the attention of another group of people - social scientists. To learn what they discovered, our David Greene sat down with NPR's social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam. DAVID GREENE, BYLINE: OK, Shankar, so explain to us exactly what social scientists were studying here.

The Fight Against Fake Drugs

The Fight Against Fake Drugs

June 4, 2014

By Tina Rosenberg - The New York Times

In November 2008, children in Nigeria taking a medicine called My Pikin Baby Teething Mixture began to die. The syrup was counterfeit, the standard glycerin replaced with cheaper diethylene glycol, which looks, smells and tastes the same. But diethylene glycol is an industrial solvent, which attacks the central nervous system, kidneys and liver. The medicine killed 84 children before it was pulled from pharmacy shelves.