David Yanagizawa-Drott

Dodgy fertiliser is keeping Uganda hungry

Dodgy fertiliser is keeping Uganda hungry

August 5, 2015

By Francisco Toro - The Guardian

For agricultural development practitioners, it’s one of the great unanswered questions: why has farm productivity in Africa lagged so far behind the rest of the developing world? A new study [by David Yanagizawa-Drott and others] suggests part of the reason is that the planting materials available to African farmers are just terrible.

Counting Ramadan: The Economics of Religion

Counting Ramadan: The Economics of Religion

July 14, 2015

By Jitendra Prakash - Foreign Affairs

To understand how Ramadan affects the economy, Public Policy Professors Filipe Campante and David Yanagizawa-Drott at the Harvard Kennedy School examined over six decades of data.

In their paper, Campante and Yanagizawa-Drott establish that Ramadan has a negative economic impact. To determine cause and effect, rather than mere correlation, they exploit a unique variation in how Ramadan is practiced worldwide

Propaganda and conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan genocide

Propaganda and conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan genocide

December 3, 2014

HKS Shorenstein Center on Media, Politics and Public Policy

A 2014 paper [by David Yanagizawa-Drott] published in the Quarterly Journal of Economics, “Propaganda and Conflict: Evidence from the Rwandan Genocide,” looks at the impact of Radio Télévision Libre des Mille Collines (RTLM), a key media outlet for the Hutu-led government, on violence and killings of the Tutsi minority.

As Millions Of People Fast For Ramadan, Does The Economy Suffer?

As Millions Of People Fast For Ramadan, Does The Economy Suffer?

July 24, 2014

By Shankar Vedantam - NPR

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST: And we are approaching the end of Ramadan, the holy month where Muslims fast from dawn to sunset. The fact that hundreds of millions of people around the world go without food all day has drawn the attention of another group of people - social scientists. To learn what they discovered, our David Greene sat down with NPR's social science correspondent, Shankar Vedantam. DAVID GREENE, BYLINE: OK, Shankar, so explain to us exactly what social scientists were studying here.

Measuring Ramadan

Measuring Ramadan

July 11, 2014

By FILIPE R. CAMPANTE and DAVID YANAGIZAWA-DROTT - New York Times

WE are in the Islamic holy month of Ramadan. During this time, as prescribed by one of the five “pillars,” or obligations, that make up the foundation of Muslim life, hundreds of millions of followers are abstaining from eating and drinking (and a host of other activities, like smoking and sex) between dawn and sunset.

The Fight Against Fake Drugs

The Fight Against Fake Drugs

June 4, 2014

By Tina Rosenberg - The New York Times

In November 2008, children in Nigeria taking a medicine called My Pikin Baby Teething Mixture began to die. The syrup was counterfeit, the standard glycerin replaced with cheaper diethylene glycol, which looks, smells and tastes the same. But diethylene glycol is an industrial solvent, which attacks the central nervous system, kidneys and liver. The medicine killed 84 children before it was pulled from pharmacy shelves.

The Slow Track to Happiness

The Slow Track to Happiness

March 12, 2014

By Alicia P.Q. Wittmeyer - Foreign Policy
Religion makes you poorer. It also makes you happier. If you think that's a contradiction, you're wrong. Anyone who has been in a Muslim country during Ramadan knows the transformation that comes about with the first sighting of the crescent moon. During the holy month, the devout fast from sunrise to sunset. Bustling thoroughfares go quiet; office hours are shorter to accommodate fasting employees; and business grinds to a halt, to the frustration of expats and foreign partners.

Watery Tea: A Novel Way to Measure the Influence of a Protest Movement

Watery Tea: A Novel Way to Measure the Influence of a Protest Movement

December 21, 2013

From the Print Edition - The Economist
HOW influential is the Tea Party? The anti-tax protests that erupted in 2009 have long since been hijacked by every right-wing group with the wit to add the words “Tea Party” to its letterhead. But new research suggests that the people whom left-wing pundits once dismissed as “teabaggers” made a big difference in the mid-term elections of 2010, when Republicans recaptured the House of Representatives.