Asim Ijaz Khwaja

Day One at “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice” Penicillin Versus the Magic Bullet, or, Why Data is Not a Mere Annoyance

Day One at “Rethinking Financial Inclusion: Smart Design for Policy and Practice” Penicillin Versus the Magic Bullet, or, Why Data is Not a Mere Annoyance

April 3, 2014

Posted by V. McIntyre, Freelance Writer for the Harvard Kennedy School
The Financial Inclusion 2020 campaign at the Center for Financial Inclusion at Accion is building a movement toward full financial inclusion by 2020. This blog series spotlights financial inclusion efforts around the globe, shares insights from the FI2020 consultative process and highlights findings from “Mapping the Invisible Market.”

Credit Score, by Multiple Choice

Credit Score, by Multiple Choice

December 30, 2013

By Sarah Wheaton - The New York Times
No credit? No problem — just take a test. DJ DiDonna, the chief operating officer of the Entrepreneurial Finance Lab, was recruited from Harvard Business School. That’s the message being delivered to more than 70,000 small-business owners in developing countries where credit ratings are rare and many potential entrepreneurs keep their money in cash rather than bank accounts.

Soft information can speak loudly when it comes to credit

Soft information can speak loudly when it comes to credit

June 5, 2013

Harvard Kennedy School Communications
By Jenny Li Fowler
There are myriad ways to measure credit risk, and sometimes "softer" is better. A new Harvard Kennedy School (HKS) Faculty Research Working Paper co-authored by HKS Professor Asim Ijaz Khwaja explores the promising potential for utilizing unconventional risk assessment methods when evaluating smaller borrowers.

The Madrasa Myth

The Madrasa Myth

June 1, 2009

Foreign Policy
By Tahir Andrabi, Jishnu Das, C. Christine Fair, and Asim Ijaz Khwaja
On May 3, the New York Times published a lengthy description of Pakistan's education system. The article, like so many before it, rehearsed a well-known narrative in which government schools are failing while madrasas are multiplying, providing a modicum of education for Pakistan's poorest children.

The Hajj: Mecca and Moderation

The Hajj: Mecca and Moderation

May 20, 2008

Published by the Brookings Institute
By Asim Ijaz Khwaja, David Clingingsmith and Michael Kremer
For many people in the West, Islam is increasingly associated with violence and terrorism. According to a 2007 survey conducted by the PEW Forum, 45 percent of Americans believe Islam is more likely to encourage violence than other religions, up from 36 percent in 2005. Close to a third of respondents use negative words like fanatic, radical and terror to describe their impressions of Islam.