EPoD News

The Big Problem With High Health Care Deductibles

The Big Problem With High Health Care Deductibles

February 5, 2016

By Margot Sanger-Katz - The New York Times

Amitabh Chandra, an economist at Harvard, and one of the researchers, said he was convinced the study would prove the value of deductibles, at least for well-off and well-educated workers. He was wrong. Over all, the workers did spend less on health care. Spending fell by about 12 percent, a remarkable decline. But the way workers achieved those savings gave the researchers pause.

Girls’ Education: An ideal target for both extremists and humanitarian interventions, scholar says

Girls’ Education: An ideal target for both extremists and humanitarian interventions, scholar says

February 4, 2016

By Shenila Khoja-Moolji - The Washington Post

Such formulations, however, not only re-articulate the binary of victim/heroine, but also abstract education from a complex web of issues such as state corruption, the hollowed-out welfare system, and lack of access to jobs, among others. In the case of Pakistan, for instance, research shows that girls are in school; in fact, there are more girls in higher education than boys!

Education is becoming an extremist battleground in Pakistan

Education is becoming an extremist battleground in Pakistan

January 29, 2016

By Tahir Andrabi and Asim Khwaja - The Washington Post

Education is a unique service – not only because it involves a country’s most precious resource, its children – but also because, by increasing human capital, it strengthens the state not only in the present, but in the future. The fact that this mutually bolstering interaction is one of the few things holding Pakistani society together is precisely why the Taliban wants to destroy it.

How To Pinpoint Delhi’s Air-Pollution Sources

How To Pinpoint Delhi’s Air-Pollution Sources

January 20, 2016

By Eric Dodge - IndiaSpend

Since the capital topped the World Health Organization’s list of most-polluted cities, the public has focused its attention on the issue and the government has responded with ever-stronger measures. Now the Indian Institute of Technology (IIT) Kanpur has released a long-awaited study that attempts to identify the sources of air pollution and inform the next wave of policies.

US-Based Study Shows 18% Reduction in Pollutants During Odd-Even Test Period

US-Based Study Shows 18% Reduction in Pollutants During Odd-Even Test Period

January 20, 2016

By Ishaan Rastogi - Car and Bike by NDTV

A new study jointly conducted by the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago (EPIC) and the Evidence for Policy Design group from Harvard University has found that there were 'stark reductions' in pollutants at around 12pm during the odd-even scheme. As a result, the rise in absolute pollution witnessed by New Delhi itself in January was a 'smaller increase' as compared with the rest of NCR.

To cut Delhi's air pollution, pinpoint the source (Special to IANS)

To cut Delhi's air pollution, pinpoint the source (Special to IANS)

January 19, 2016

By Eric Dodge & Rohini Pande - Business Standard

This winter, Delhi's government and the judiciary have implemented several policies aimed at cutting the national capital's air pollution. The just-concluded odd-even scheme in the city required motorists to find alternative means of transportation every other day.

 To Cut Delhi’s Air Pollution, Pinpoint The Source

To Cut Delhi’s Air Pollution, Pinpoint The Source

January 19, 2016

By Eric Dodge and Rohini Pande - India Spend

On some days the air may be clearer. But what remains hazy is where Delhi’s air pollution comes from. Over the years, multiple attempts to find out–-called source apportionment studies–have yielded contradictory results.

Yes, Delhi, it worked

Yes, Delhi, it worked

January 19, 2016

By Michael Greenstone, Santosh Harish, Anant Sudarshan, and Rohini Pande - The Indian Express

Delhi’s ambitious odd-even pilot experiment to reduce the number of cars on the road, and pollution in the air, has come to an end — at least for now. But the question remains: Was it successful?