EPoD News

How to Prevent a Disaster for Children in Developing Countries

How to Prevent a Disaster for Children in Developing Countries

May 6, 2016

By Doug Gavel - Harvard Kennedy School

The disruption and harm caused by global climate change is expected to be even more pronounced in developing countries, and children in those countries could face myriad risks, but there are actions that can be taken now to reduce those risks.  A new paper authored by Rema Hanna identifies several possible policy solutions that can ameliorate the impact of climate change on the health and safety of children living in poor countries

Building the evidence base for developing countries: An example from the effect of pollution on infant health in Mexico

Building the evidence base for developing countries: An example from the effect of pollution on infant health in Mexico

April 16, 2016

By Eva Arceo, Rema Hanna, Paulina Oliva - VOX

Pollution levels are orders of magnitude higher in lower-income countries than in the developed world. This means that studies of the health effects of pollution based on data from the latter will not necessarily be relevant to the former. This column reports on the effect of air pollution on infant mortality in Mexico City. Significant effects are found that are much larger than found in earlier work based on US data, highlighting the potential pitfalls of extrapolating findings from high-income to developing countries.

How To Get India’s Women Working? First, Let Them Out Of The House

How To Get India’s Women Working? First, Let Them Out Of The House

April 9, 2016

By Rohini Pande, Jennifer Johnson, and Eric Dodge - IndiaSpend

India boasts superior rates of women serving in political office compared to other emerging economies: the nation just swore in its 16th female Chief Minister, Mehbooba Mufti. Yet it lags well behind its competitors in its rate of women’s labour force participation. There is surprisingly little data to answer why. But one reason stands out: women can’t get to work.

Asking the right question to get the right policy

Asking the right question to get the right policy

April 4, 2016

By Eric Dodge, Charity Troyer Moore, and Rohini Pande - Ideas for India

There is consensus in the development community on the importance of bridging the gap between researchers and practitioners; however, misaligned incentives underlie this gap. In this article, Pande, Moore and Dodge of Harvard Kennedy School, explain how bringing policymakers together with researchers to work more iteratively ensured that data from MGNREGA - the world’s largest public works programme - became accessible and relevant to those who use it.

How doorstep banking increased savings and income in Sri Lanka

How doorstep banking increased savings and income in Sri Lanka

March 30, 2016

By Michael Callen, Suresh de Mel, Craig McIntosh, and Christopher Woodruff - Ideas For India

Recent findings in development economics indicate that microloans are likely to perform best when accompanied by financial education, insurance, and savings products. This column presents evidence from an experiment in Sri Lanka, which involved offering saving accounts with door-to-door deposit collection services to otherwise unbanked rural households. It suggests that the programme incentivised participants to increase savings by increasing their income.

The Surprising Reason Why Savings Boosts Income

The Surprising Reason Why Savings Boosts Income

March 22, 2016

By V. McIntyre - Inclusion Hub

New research reveals an unexpected benefit of financial inclusion: Savings accounts increase income as well as savings. In Kenya, Nepal and Sri Lanka, people work more to earn more when they get easy access to savings accounts they trust.

The Surprising Reason Why Savings Boosts Income: New Research Reveals an Unexpected Benefit of Financial Inclusion

The Surprising Reason Why Savings Boosts Income: New Research Reveals an Unexpected Benefit of Financial Inclusion

March 16, 2016

By V. McIntyre - NextBillion

Make it easier to save, and people will save more and earn more. This sounds a little more surprising, especially if you posit that this increase in income will happen almost immediately. But researchers in Kenya, Nepal and Sri Lanka have revealed that given a savings account, poor customers do save, earn and consume more. And they do that quicker than we would expect them to.

Big Data Isn’t Enough

Big Data Isn’t Enough

March 14, 2016

By Michael Fryar - Inclusion Hub

Researchers love talking about their data and methods as a “toolbox." With the rise of big data, they’ve got a fancy new tool. It’s important to remember, however, that the reason for carrying a toolbox is that there are very few projects where just one tool — no matter how powerful — is sufficient to get the job done.

Big Data isn’t Enough: We Need an ‘All of the Above’ Strategy to Drive Innovation in Financial Inclusion

Big Data isn’t Enough: We Need an ‘All of the Above’ Strategy to Drive Innovation in Financial Inclusion

March 9, 2016

By Michael Fryar - NextBillion

Researchers love talking about their data and methods as a “toolbox,” and with the rise of big data, they’ve got a fancy new tool. It’s important to remember, however, that the reason for carrying a toolbox is that there are very few projects where just one tool, no matter how powerful, is sufficient to get the job done. It’s necessary to recognize the weaknesses of big data as well as its strengths, and to think about what other types of data are needed to complement it.

Five Key Lessons About Women And Work In India

Five Key Lessons About Women And Work In India

March 8, 2016

By Rohini Pande, Charity Troyer Moore, and Jennifer Johnson - IndiaSpend

In the South Asian context, on International Women’s Day, our analysis of the state of women and work in India does not offer clear explanation. Countries often experience a dip in women’s labour-force participation as incomes rises and women drop out of low-paying menial work, usually in agriculture. But typically as the economy develops further and education levels rise, more and more women enter the labour force.