Policy Research Engagements

Our affiliates are engaged with public and private in-country partners to design and test policies that improve the lives of the poor. more >

EPoD Publications

EPoD faculty have published in academic journals, contributing knowledge to school reform, health policy, gender quotas and the environment. more >

Teaching Smart Policy Design

We teach the Smart Policy Design process and impact evaluation to policymakers, practitioners, and Harvard students. more >

Get Involved

There are many ways to get involved in EPoD: as an in-country partner, research fellow, visiting scholar, or donor.
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Smart Policy Design
Approaching Policy Formulation & Implementation as a Design Challenge
EPoD Smart Policy Design

Identify pressing policy problems
Diagnose underlying causes
Design feasible policy solutions based on theory & evidence
Implement and Test solutions with rigorous evaluation
Refine solutions with continuous monitoring & feedback

 

News

NexThought Monday - The (Financial) Wisdom of the Crowd: How a group of non-experts outperformed traditional credit ratings at identifying good and bad borrowers

NexThought Monday - The (Financial) Wisdom of the Crowd: How a group of non-experts outperformed traditional credit ratings at identifying good and bad borrowers

March 9, 2015

By V. McIntyre - Next Billion

Determining risk has always been a hurdle for financial inclusion practitioners, as well as a barrier for small and micro-businesses looking to expand. But if non-traditional measures prove dependable, they may fill the information gap and make lending to poor entrepreneurs and small businesses more feasible...Working with the American P2P website Prosper.com, Asim Khwaja...and coauthors Rajkamal Iyer, Erzo F.P. Luttmer and Kelly Shue analyzed 194,033 borrower listings from the site, 17,212 of which were funded.

In Forecasting Health Costs, Let Technology Be Your Guide

In Forecasting Health Costs, Let Technology Be Your Guide

March 9, 2015

By Austin Frakt - The New York Times

...Putting these and other factors together, Amitabh Chandra, Jonathan Holmes and Jonathan Skinner, in a paper for the Brookings Institution, made a quantitative prediction. Health spending will grow at a pace above that of the overall economy, but slower — 1.2 percent above gross domestic product — than it has historically — 2.4 percent — though the authors also express caution about this prediction...

EPoD News